home

Frustrations of Voting Reform "activism"

Here is something I wrote shortly before the meeting on March 12. Worth repeating.

Well, I might as well write something to the Fair Vote Ginger list. I have been twittering away trying to figure out how to promote next weeks event http://www.qaz.ca/event/Chongeventpage.html on that medium.

I do not think I am doing the greatest job. Most of the twitter accounts I messaged, I am now on and getting all their stuff whether I need it or not. Whoever is following me on twitter who is not a netbot is probably getting sick of hearing about the event. I am not sure if I am even getting through to many people. Maybe should have read some how tos before starting.

I do hope I can get a decent turnout to this event. I am worried about not only Toronto apathy but the difficulty getting word of anything out that does not fit with some network's aims.

But I am really disappointed with the blank stupid response I got from FV Toronto. They not only do not announce the event, they seem to be trying to sabotage it. They are sending messages around presumably to seek information but having the effect of creating doubts in people's minds about me.

It seems that Chong's office is getting inquiries from somewhere, that they have to contact me to confirm certain things. From their reply which they inadvertantly sent to me as well, somebody was asking strange questions. It seems Chong's office is having to repeatedly confirm that he is attending the event, and somebody is insinuating he might be ambushed in some way.

I am also wondering these days if I should continue to spend so much time on voting reform, especially at the municipal level. With the two bills I have pasted below, it seems like the fight there is pretty much over. Both bills do not give any room at all for any idea other than ranked ballot. Alternative vote is just another term for the same thing.

So what are the idiots who pretend to be opposing ranked ballots for city council talking about? There is no competent advocacy for PR at the city level at all. I have been over the MoVE statement and their web site. These clowns seem incapable of even uttering the words "proportional representation" on that website.

There is no basis at all for the statement "Thanks to Shein and Hunter, Toronto could have proportional representation in 2018." What is going on here?

I cannot do anything by myself. If there is nothing at all to work with, I have other things to work on, and people who are really trying to win, not engage in self defeating nonsense. I am talking about a Basic Income.

But we have Lead Now and especially Democracy Watch who are advocating for PR at the federal level and have the desire and ability to succeed. It looks like PR is going to succeed federally; other options are at a dead end.

What the recent Liberal convention passed reads thus;

"AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT immediately after the next election, an all-Party process be instituted, involving expert assistance and citizen participation, to report to Parliament within 12 months with recommendations for electoral reforms including, without limitation, a preferential ballot and/or a form of proportional representation, to represent Canadians more fairly and serve Canada better."

This really does hold the door open for PR. And as I said, there are at least competent groups advocating for it at that level. Fair Vote and this MoVe are hopeless.

tr

Here are the bills

Bill 166                                                       2014

An Act to amend the City of Toronto Act, 2006 to allow the City of Toronto to pass a ranked ballot by-law for city council elections

Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, enacts as follows:

  

1.  Section 8 of the City of Toronto Act, 2006 is amended by adding the following subsections: Ranked ballot by-law

  

(2.1)  The City may pass a by-law that adopts a ranked ballot voting system for the election of members of city council and establishes the procedure for the ranked ballot election.

Ranked ballot by-law public consultation requirements

  

(2.2)  Before city council votes on whether to pass, amend, revise or repeal a by-law made under subsection (2.1), the city council shall consult the public in accordance with any prescribed public consultation requirements.

Ranked ballot by-law requires approval

  

(2.3)  No by-law made under subsection (2.1), and no amendment to, revision of or repeal of such a by-law, has any force or effect until it is approved by the Lieutenant Governor in Council.

 

  2.  Section 11 of the Act is amended by adding the following subsection:

Ranked ballot by-law prevails

  

(3)  Despite subsections (1) and (2), a by-law made under subsection 8 (2.1) and approved under subsection 8 (2.3) prevails over and may modify the application of any provision of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996 or of any regulation made under that Act.

  

3.  Subsection 152 (1) of the Act is amended by adding the following clause:

  

(k)  prescribing public consultation requirements for the purposes of subsection 8 (2.2). Commencement

  

4.  This Act comes into force on January 1, 2015.

Short title

 

  5.  The short title of this Act is the Toronto Ranked Ballot Elections Act, 2014.

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The City of Toronto Act, 2006 is amended to allow the City of Toronto to pass a by-law adopting a ranked ballot voting system for the election of members of city council. The Lieutenant Governor in Council may prescribe public consultation requirements that city council must meet before voting on a ranked ballot by-law. The by-law would only have force and effect if approved by the Lieutenant Governor in Council. The by-law prevails over and may modify the application of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996 and its regulations.

Bill 163, City of Toronto Alternative Voting System Act, 2014

Schein, Jonah Current Status: First Reading Carried

An Act to amend the Municipal Elections Act, 1996 to allow the City of Toronto to adopt an alternative voting system

Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, enacts as follows:

  

1.  The Municipal Elections Act, 1996 is amended by adding the following section:

City of Toronto ‹ Alternative Voting System

City of Toronto by-law re alternative voting system

  

45.1  (1)  The council of the City of Toronto may pass a by-law adopting an alternative voting system for the election of a member of city council, including the mayor, and establishing rules with respect to the voting procedure and counting of votes under the alternative voting system.

Application of by-law

  

(2)  A by-law passed under subsection (1) applies to an election as specified in the by-law.

Conflict

  

(3)  A by-law made under subsection (1) prevails over the prescribed provisions of this Act and the prescribed provisions of the regulations made under this Act.

  

2.  Subsection 95 (1) of the Act is amended by adding the following clause:

(c.0.1) if the council of the City of Toronto has passed a by-law under subsection 45.1 (1),

          

(i)  provide for transitional matters that, in the opinion of the Minister, are necessary or desirable to implement an alternative voting system adopted by the City of Toronto,

         

(ii)  govern, clarify or vary the application of provisions of this Act or provisions of the regulations made under this Act in respect of an alternative voting system adopted by the City of Toronto,

        

(iii)  prescribe, for the purpose of subsection 45.1 (3), provisions of this Act and provisions of the regulations made under this Act;

Commencement

  

3.  This Act comes into force on the day it receives Royal Assent.

Short title

  

4.  The short title of this Act is the City of Toronto Alternative Voting System Act, 2014.

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The Bill amends the Municipal Elections Act, 1996 to authorize the City of Toronto to pass a by-law adopting an alternative voting system for the election of members of city council, including the mayor.